Stuttering? Your Brain’s Blood Flow Is The Culprit!

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Even emperors and kings stutter, that’s what the video below says. So, if you are a stutterer, you shouldn’t worry as it isn’t a huge hindrance to your bright future. However, it’s still fascinating to know how this speech condition comes about. So, continue reading below!

A recent study suggested that stuttering is caused by the improper regulation of blood flow to the brain’s Broca’s area found in the frontal lobe. The Broca’s area, along with the Wernicke’s area found in the temporal lobe and enable speech formation. Called the Neural Language Loop, these parts are important in creating concise and clear speech.

When blood flow is disrupted in the Broca’s area, a person will struggle in producing the right words. The Wernicke’s area, which functions as the brain’s word picker could still transfer the information to the Broca’s area. However, if problems occur at the Broca, stuttering may occur because the individual could not speak out the words to say.

This finding means that stutters are not less intelligent than other people. Well we know that, but people assume they are. It’s a speech impairment that affects a person’s ability to produce speech but it doesn’t mean that the individual cannot compose a sentence or statement. Fortunately, kids who develop this condition can outgrow it but adults who had the condition later in life need to undergo speech therapy.

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Generally, improper blood flow to the brain could cause stuttering according to the research. However, it is also important to note that stress and anxiety could worsen the condition. The reason behind is that the brain areas responsible for attention and language processing is also associated with the parts that generate emotions. Any disturbances could affect one’s speech too.

Stuttering, hopefully, could be cured permanently one day especially with these new findings from the recent studies. Scientists could use the information to study more and develop new methods that could improve stuttering.

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